Kristoffer Olsson making ‘significant progress’ after diagnosis of blood clots in brain



Former Arsenal midfielder Kristoffer Olsson has made “significant physical progress” after being diagnosed as having multiple small blood clots on both sides of his brain, his club Midtjylland has said.

Olsson, 28, was hospitalised in Aarhus, Denmark after losing consciousness on February 20. The footballer was placed on a ventilator in hospital and has since been transferred to a specialist neurology centre.

The midfielder was diagnosed as having an “extremely rare inflammatory condition in his brain vessels”.

His club have shared a positive update of Olsson’s progress, outlining that the Sweden international has “regained motor function and his verbal abilities” and can now eat independently, while he is now “actively training his walking function.”

The statement from Midtjylland reads the player has made “significant physical progress” and while “cognitive challenges remain and the prognosis for his full recovery remains uncertain”, medics have been “greatly encouraged by his recovery.

The Danish club’s managing director Claus Steinlein has said: “It is breathtaking to witness Kristoffer’s fight against the disease. His positive attitude, fighting spirit and tireless will to win are an inspiration to us all.”

Olsson came through Arsenal’s youth academy but made just one first-team appearance for the club, featuring in a League Cup match against West Bromwich Albion in 2013.

The midfielder subsequently joined Midtjylland, before stints at AIK, Krasnodar and Anderlecht before rejoining the Danish club, initially on a loan deal, in 2022.

The Sweden international has made 20 appearances in all competitions for the Danish side this season, assisting five times. He last featured on February 9 against Fredrikstad.

Olsson made the first of his 47 international appearances for Sweden’s national team in 2017. He featured in four of his nation’s games at the delayed European Championships in 2021.

(Linnea Rheborg/Getty Images)





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