Gucci Fall 2024 Is All About the ‘Sleek-and-Chic’ Look


One year into his role at Gucci, creative director Sabato De Sarno has nailed down a sort of signature look that presents a tale of two aesthetics. That was the vision at Gucci’s fall 2024 runway show, which was a study of contrasts that rotated between maximalism and minimalism. Call it something for everyone—as models paraded down the raised runway in an industrial space in Milan, it felt like the two ideas of restraint and expressive joy were at play.

The collection opened up with severe, chic-and-sleek looks. There were short jumpsuits with big boots, wool suiting turned into mini playsuits, and a bodycon chartreuse dress, all of which appealed to the lovers of ’90s and early 2000s-era Gucci. (It’s no wonder, as collectors are eagerly snapping up gems from the time period all over the resale market.)

Next came coats with sequined fringe and bijoux collars, plus shining slip dresses that glimmered away like stars in the Milky Way. If there was any question about where the hedonistic days of glamor have gone, De Sarno answered it in the form of clothes that were made for late-night parties. There were lingerie detail tops mixed with tiny sunglasses, and naked-look dresses paired with heavy coats. Those ultra-detailed lace dresses collided with a sea of mini V-neck sequin dresses, firmly anchored by sturdy leather riding boots in deep shades of hunter green and burgundy. The high-low effect of casual-meets-formal spoke to real-world, personal style. The finishing touches? Slicked-back hair and fabric choker necklaces covered in crystals to match most of the outfits.

Photo by Giovanni Giannoni/WWD via Getty Images
Photo by Giovanni Giannoni/WWD via Getty Images
Photo by Daniele Venturelli/Getty Images for Gucci
Photo by Giovanni Giannoni/WWD via Getty Images
Photo by Giovanni Giannoni/WWD via Getty Images
Photo by Giovanni Giannoni/WWD via Getty Images

“My fashion lies in capturing the extraordinary where the ordinary is expected,” De Sarno said in the show notes. The collection, according to Gucci, was all about “embodying a meticulous journey of small subversive acts that come together to portray his vision of the Gucci wardrobe, one where fashion converses with reality.”

The outerwear was most striking. A striped python jacket in deep red and royal purple, or quilted coats with really great structure captivated. Most of all, coats that were big and bulky in a weirdly good way were a feast for the eyes. The color palette for these pieces matched sweet with dark: pale lemons, baby blues, and olive greens against inky black and lush caramels. This is not the magpie style of former Gucci creative director Alessandro Michele, but it certainly will appeal to that fan base—as well as those who prefer tailored, all-black silhouettes.

Photo by Giovanni Giannoni/WWD via Getty Images
Photo by Giovanni Giannoni/WWD via Getty Images
Photo by Giovanni Giannoni/WWD via Getty Images
Photo by Giovanni Giannoni/WWD via Getty Images
Photo by Giovanni Giannoni/WWD via Getty Images
Photo by Giovanni Giannoni/WWD via Getty Images
Photo by Giovanni Giannoni/WWD via Getty Images
Photo by Giovanni Giannoni/WWD via Getty Images

Photo by Giovanni Giannoni/WWD via Getty Images



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